Tripp Review: Make Mine Music

By Jon Tripp

Not much to see here, folks. Basically a collection of Silly Symphonies with delusions of Fantasia‘s grandeur. The highlight is probably the segment “All The Cats Join In”, a jazz-era romp that looks like it features the Archie gang and contains some surprisingly ribald humor for a Disney production… It almost feel like a “this is your kid on jazz!” PSA for parents.

Side note: steer clear of the Disney Gold Collection DVD, which is not only abridged (missing “The Martins and The Coys” segment) but also features an embarrassingly bad transfer and is artificially transferred into widescreen, cropping the top and bottom of the frame. All around, an underwhelming viewing experience.

Tripp Review: John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum

By Jon Tripp

For the first half or so, I thought, “This is the best John Wick movie!” Then he gets back to the Continental and I kinda checked out for the next 45 minutes. I know this is supposed to be the great action franchise of this generation, but I just can’t get behind it. It’s just good enough that I’ll eventually get around to watching each movie on DVD.

Rating: three stars

Tripp Review: Streets of Fire

By Jon Tripp

What even is this glorious 1980s mess?

Willem Dafoe busts up a Face To Face concert and kidnaps the lead singer (Diane Lane, apparently having left The Stains) in a scene that reminded me of the opening of Double Dragon. Rick Moranis is cast hilariously against type as her asshole manager/boyfriend. Enter Michael Paré (the Scott to Lane’s Envy), who agrees to rescue her, armed only with a shotgun that can blow up a vehicle with each shell. Also, Lee Ving is here! And Bill Paxton with a psychobilly pompadour! And the dancer from Flashdance! And Dafoe wears leather overalls, shirtless! And then there’s a rock-hammer duel! Why not!?

If you ever thought that The Warriors would be the perfect movie if only there were five or six musical interludes, or that Buckaroo Banzai would be better without the science fiction… Well, you’d be wrong both times, but at least you will enjoy the hell out of Streets of Fire.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 1/2

Tripp Review: Mom and Dad

By Jon Tripp

If you ever wanted to see Nic Cage try to level a pool table while listening to Reagan Youth, and then immediately demolish that pool table while scream-singing The Hokey Pokey, then boy do I have the movie for you.

Flavors of 28 Days Later, Pontypool, and The People Under The Stairs blended with a liberal dash of grade-A Cage Rage, and a good time is had by all.

Random cameo by Grant Morrison as a cable news talking head, because why the hell not.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️ 1/2

JC Is My Co-Pilot

One of last year’s more remarkable collaborations came from Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker and Canadian pianist Chilly Gonzales. Their Room 29 was released on the consummate classical  label Deutsche Grammophon. Cocker’s witty and droll lyrics were inspired by room 29 at the infamous Chateau Marmont in Los Angeles.

The following video is a live recording of one of my favorite tracks from the album. To dive deep into the lyrics, check out this Chilly Gonzales fan site.

About Betty’s Boob

Late last week, BOOM! Studios announced the forthcoming publication of About Betty’s Boob by Véro Cazot and Julie Rocheleau. According to a press release, this original graphic novel promises “an affecting and inspired examination of one woman’s painful, surreal, and oddly humorous journey following a mastectomy.”

As someone who had cervical cancer and currently has a benign [though very painful] fibroadenoma, I am very intrigued by this book. I am hopeful that it will pair well with Marisa Acocella Marchetto’s stellar Cancer Vixen.

About Betty’s Boob is slated for release in June 2018 through BOOM! Studios’ Archaia imprint.

 

about bettys boob

In True Love with Charlotte Hatherley

Here’s a taste of my favorite albums of 2017. True Love, by Charlotte Hatherley, is definitely at the top of my list. Some may know Hatherley as the former guitarist of Ash. Currently, she plays guitar for Birdy.

On the side, Hatherley has created a lush, gem of an album. And I can’t get enough of it! Here’s “A Sign” from True Love. You can learn about the inspiration behind the song here.

Stay tuned to this blog for more of my top albums of 2017!

Review: Deepwater Horizon

Deepwater Horizon is what an action-drama should be. Disclosure: I’m a Peter Berg flunky (“Clear Eyes! Full Hearts!”). I even own Battleship, but who doesn’t like a movie that stars Tim Riggins, Eric Northman, and actual Navy veterans?

What impressed me the most about Deepwater Horizon were the sets. After the movie,  I watched all of the bonus features and learned about how much were actual “live” affects. Flames, explosions, geysers of mud … they even built their own mini rig on the water! Say what you will about Berg, but the man is extremely passionate and doesn’t half-ass things (I met him once, and he was a wee bit intimidating).

Deepwater Horizon director Peter Berg (R) promoting Battleship with Alexander Skarsgard (L) and Brooklyn Decker (center) at WonderCon 2012

John Malkovich oozes creepiness. His character personifies corporate greed and his accent is kinda amazing. Thankfully, my hometown boy, Mark Wahlberg, made no attempt to sound southern. Maybe just slightly less Dorchester.

If you’re keeping track, this film rounds out Kurt Russell’s Trio of Movies with Facial Hair (Hateful Eight and Bone Tomahawk being the first two). I can never unsee what I saw in Bone Tomahawk. Never. You should watch it.

Deepwater Horizon felt like a good tribute/depiction of the actual events. Berg wanted people to remember that there wasn’t just an oil spill (the worst in our nation’s history) but that lives were lost. Sure, they take liberties, but I’m not so close to the subject material to take umbrage. I don’t know if I will be able to say the same about Patriot’s Day.

Deepwater Horizon was the eighth movie that I’ve watched this year. Check out my film diary on Letterboxd